On Rich ground

Well...done.

By Melissa Petersen / Photography By Melissa Petersen | August 28, 2017
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Well … done.

When we started Edible Memphis —

10 years ago — there were just two farmers’ markets. There were no restaurants by Kelly English, Ryan Trimm, Andy Ticer & Michael Hudman. It was Wild Oats, not Whole Foods. “Farm to table” wasn’t a buzzword. There were no food trucks, food policy council, or CSAs. There were a few community gardens, but nothing like the vast network we see now through Memphis Tilth and The Kitchen Community. Recycling and composting were almost non-existent. There wasn’t a lot of vegetarian anything, let alone vegan. We had one local brewer.

We saw that Memphis, as a food destination, had potential.

One of the first people we talked to about the magazine asked “Once you talk about BBQ, what will there be to talk about?” Frankly, that comment ticked me off and I most certainly avoided talking about BBQ much within our pages — just to prove them wrong.

There’s been plenty to talk about — about 1 million words — about our farmers, chefs, artisans, non-profits, activists, traditions, meats, fruits, and vegetables.

And there is still plenty to talk about.

After a decade of being focused almost solely on food, Kjeld and I would like to branch out and explore other things. There are so many other areas to learn about, lend expertise to, cheerlead, and drive.

With our energy and focus diverted onto other things, this is the last issue of Edible Memphis that we’ll publish. We’ve had interest from other people about taking up the reins and new energy and a larger team could certainly grow the magazine’s reach and impact. We’ll let you know what happens.

As a whole, publishing a magazine has been a ridiculous amount of fun. We have met hundreds of great people and have seen — up close — the impact that positive story-telling can have on people, businesses, and a community.

Though our part here is done, yours isn’t. Getting to know where your food comes from, choosing local, and voting with your forks are still up to you. What you do — how you eat and shop — matters.

Best,

Melissa

 

Article from Edible Memphis at http://ediblememphis.ediblecommunities.com/food-thought/welldone
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